Bay Networks unveils secure remote-access products

Bay Networks Inc. announced a remote-access concentrator and software that will help agencies securely connect remote users to the office network or the Internet.

The Model 8000 Remote Access Concentrator (8000 RAC) fills out the mid- to high-end range of Bay Networks' remote-access line of products. "Three or four years ago this was not mainstream today remote access is prime time " said Rohit Mehra senior product manager of the Remote-Access Server Division at Bay Networks.

The 8000 RAC available in October supports up to 48 concurrent users and targets large enterprises and Internet service providers. "The real users would be those working from home people traveling and telecommuting who need to connect back to the office or users who need to access information systems applications that are in another location " Mehra said. This would apply to the government which has encouraged telecommuting he added.

The 8000 RAC is a software-upgradable stand-alone multiprocessor product that supports both of the pre-standard 56 kilobits/sec. modem technologies on the market today. It also supports multiple protocols including Novell Inc.'s IPX Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol Apple Computer Inc.'s AppleTalk and others which many agencies support Mehra added.

Agencies should be interested in the security features of the product Mehra said including support for the Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) standard.

Later this fall the company will ship the BaySecure Access Control RADIUS server which is optimized for Microsoft Corp. Windows NT Novell Inc. NetWare and Unix platforms. It provides user authentication authorization and accounting solutions and it integrates network directories so there is no need to create a directory from scratch Mehra said. It will also interface with an SQL database.

Virginia Brooks director of networking research at Aberdeen Group Inc. said one of the distinguishing features of the 8000 RAC is its support for the two 56 kilobits/sec. modem technologies. "It's all in the same box " she said. "Administrators don't have to learn a different skill set to support two different [modem] technologies."

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