CSC shows briefing center

Computer Sciences Corp. last week took the wraps off its $30 million 36 000-square-foot conference center in Falls Church Va. which will host federal and commercial organizations.

The Executive Briefing Center features videoconferencing facilities equipped with PictureTel Corp. equipment computer-based training rooms and a 98-seat theater for presentations. Many of the building's meeting tables are equipped with recessed jacks so that users can connect notebook computers to the Internet or in the case of CSC employees the company's internal network. Additionally the building is wired for 100Base-T networking. The main purpose of the center is to brief prospective customers and conduct internal training.

Van B. Honeycutt chairman president and chief executive officer of CSC said the center will be used mostly to brief commercial clients although company officials expect to conduct presentations for federal executives as well. Honeycutt said the center will provide a forum for discussing the company's outsourcing capabilities with prospects around the world. Outsourcing contracts have helped propel CSC's commercial revenue to about 75 percent of the company's $5.8 billion business.

But Honeycutt said he remains committed to the federal market. "We think it's a great business to be in " he said. "We're going to stay in it." He said the company has adjusted well to the indefinite-delivery indefinite-quantity contracting environment that characterizes the federal integration services market.

William Loomis a vice president with stock brokerage firm Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. said CSC has become "more aggressive" in the federal market and it is looking at potential acquisitions in that sector. That is a shift from two years ago when Honeycutt became CEO and headquarters appeared to be "defocusing on federal " Loomis said.

As for federal acquisitions CSC is "looking fairly broadly" and may target as other integrators have companies with intelligence business.

A CSC spokesman said the company has always looked at potential acquisitions in the federal market as a matter of course.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.