Volume-Licensing Service Keeps Software Police at Bay

If you are having difficulty keeping track of your agency's software licenses, you might want to take a look at a service from ASAP Software Express, Buffalo Grove, Ill., which is designed to make it easier to identify, track and audit large software inventories.

The company's volume-license agreement (VLA) implementation program has a simple sales pitch: Without better coordination among people brokering software licensing agreements, governments chronically fail to maximize volume-discount opportunities.

Until it became one of ASAP's first state customers, that was the case in Arizona. "Our state is really decentralized in terms of purchasing," said Wendy Summers, a senior procurement specialist in the Arizona Department of Administration's State Procurement Office. "This helps us keep track of what our agencies are buying. It also helps with our negotiating. Before, we used to buy shrink-wrapped software with no rhyme or reason."

The VLA implementation program costs nothing; instead, it is being offered as part of many large, negotiated contracts. The VLA provides customers with quarterly reports of license usage as well as "situational" audits of current software practices.

"If the software police come and knock on your door, you need to understand what you have purchased," added Randy Lee, ASAP's director of government sales.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.