Computer Sciences garners $131 million contract option

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has exercised an option to continue an existing contract with Computer Sciences Corp. for the provision of information services to Marshall and to NASA agencywide.

The option, valued at $131 million, covers the period of May 1, 1998, through April 30, 1999. It continues efforts under a contract called Program Information Systems Mission Services (Prisms), which was awarded to CSC in 1994.

Work performed by CSC and its subcontractors under Prisms includes support to Marshall in computer systems, applications software, networks, telephone systems, data reduction and audio-video services. It also includes services in support of the entire agency, including management of several wide-area networks, agencywide information management systems and the NASA Automated Data Processing Consolidation Center.

The option is the third of a possible six priced options. If all options are exercised, the Prisms contract has an approximate total value of $1 billion.

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VR software vendor nabs AF contract

Applied Visions Inc., a software development company specializing in mission-critical client/server systems, announced last month that it has been awarded a $700,000 Air Force contract for network security real-time monitoring visualization.

AVI's SecureScope methodology is designed to allow users to select or develop a set of virtual reality metaphors that represent the array of different events and objects being monitored on a network. Frank Zinghini, president and founder of AVI, said that although various security-monitoring software logs threats, access attempts and session and user activity, many times it is difficult for network administrators to decipher all this information in real time.

"AVI's use of virtual reality in real-time network security monitoring will help our organization to be more responsive to threats and vulnerabilities," said Brian Spinks, security analyst and project manager at the Air Force's Rome Laboratory, Rome, N.Y. "In a crisis, the amount of information generated by network security software is overwhelming. AVI's SecureScope methodology will help people more quickly and easily react to threats."

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Cisco ships new port adapter

Cisco Systems Inc. began shipping last month a Channel Port Adapter (CPA) designed for users who need to access Internet Protocol-based and Systems Network Architecture-based applications located on a mainframe.

The CPA is designed to connect the Cisco 7200 Series router directly to a mainframe at a lower price than the company's Channel Interface Processor, which is Cisco's high-performance mainframe connectivity product.

The CPA incorporates parallel or Enterprise System Connection interfaces, an on-board reduced instruction-set computer processor, up to 32M of memory and 512K of cache memory. It is available on the General Services Administration schedule held by Vion Corp., Government Technology Services Inc., Sylvest Management Systems, Unisys Corp. and Bell Atlantic, among others.

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Digital signs on new distributor

Digital Equipment Corp. has signed Dartnell Enterprises Inc. as a U.S. distributor. Rochester, N.Y.-based DEI, which has been reselling Digital products since 1988, will focus on Digital's reseller and prime contractor 8(a) business opportunities, Digital said.

In addition to its own reseller expertise, DEI specializes in software development, information technology support services and turnkey solutions in document and image management, databases and network management.

DEI has about 100 employees in eight U.S. offices.

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GMSI forms alliance with Adaytum

Systems integrator Global Management Systems Inc., Bethesda, Md., last month announced a strategic partnership with software vendor Adaytum Software.

Adaytum, based in Minneapolis, markets Adaytum Planning budget management software. Adaytum plans to leverage GMSI's coverage of the mid-Atlantic, particularly in the Washington, D.C., area, where GMSI works with both federal and commercial customers. GMSI will provide installation, consulting and training services for Adaytum Planning customers, the two companies said.

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EMC gets deal at supercomputer center

The National Center for Supercomputing Applications has selected EMC Corp. to provide storage systems and software for its supercomputing, archiving and virtual reality applications.

EMC will provide its Symmetrix 3700 Enterprise Storage system, running its Symmetrix Multihost Transfer Facility information sharing software. SMTF makes it possible to manage data from different computing platforms on a single Symmetrix system.

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Allied Telysyn to unveil new hubs

Allied Telesyn International plans to announce this week its new AT-FH700 family of dual-speed Fast Ethernet hubs. The new family of hubs was designed specifically to serve the growing needs of small and medium-size networks with "the typical mix of high-bandwidth applications and legacy local-area network devices."

Sean Keohane, vice president of marketing and engineering at Allied Telesyn, Sunnyvale, Calif., said the hubs will allow network managers to take advantage of Fast Ethernet transmission speeds of up to 100 megabits/sec while continuing to serve low-end users at traditional speeds of 10 megabits/sec.

AT-FH700 hubs continually sense the maximum transmission speed of attached devices and deliver an instant tenfold performance improvement by automatically operating at 100 megabits/sec when a connected device indicates that it is Fast Ethernet capable, the company said.

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