Letter to the Editor

Army logistics revisited

In elaboration of the letter from Bob Eufinger at the Army Logistics Systems Support Center (LSSC) [FCW, June 22] regarding the Wholesale Logistics Modernization Plan, formerly the Logistics Modernization program effort, the Army proceeded on a major effort without planning and under a command mentality (i.e., "We can order it done."). Unfortunately, the redesign or replacement of the world's largest, most complex and totally integrated logistics system that supports U.S. armed forces and those of our allies is no easy task. Even maintenance of the current system is very difficult and must be done intelligently. Someone also forgot about the Year 2000 issue.

The Army further assumed that a commercial system with both military and commercial utility was out there somewhere just waiting to be adopted.

Unfortunately, this assumption was wrong because no other system in the world is flexible enough to support contingencies ranging in size from humanitarian efforts to World War III.

Our American system has this functional capability of infinite scalability. It is one of the things that defines our superpower status.

Then, devoid of a plan, the Army embarked on an acquisition effort for a phantom new system without defined requirements. Also, to make matters even worse, they decided to draft a request for proposal without the very people who had the knowledge to develop it. As a result, communication is now being conducted through intermediaries such as [the General Accounting Office]. This apparently protects some very large egos but doesn't constitute effective communication.

Finally, the LSSC employees became fed up and voted to form an ESOP because if we have to be privatized, we might as well control some of our future.

Conrad A. Lohutko, Ph.D.Strategic planning specialist

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