Fedwire

GAO hits DOD info superiority efforts

The Defense Department's plan to develop a command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) architecture capable of delivering "information superiority" to the warfighter is a long way from becoming a reality and faces significant challenges, according to the General Accounting Office.

In a report delivered last month to Congress, GAO concluded that "achieving information superiority will be expensive and complex...[and] DOD...may need many years of concerted effort to reach" its information superiority goals.

According to GAO, DOD's experiences with the Global Command and Control System and the Joint Tactical Radio System are indicative of the challenges facing the department's information superiority objective. "In the absence of a C4ISR architecture, DOD has had mixed success in developing and fielding GCCS," the report said. In addition, GCCS has potential Year 2000 problems that could cause significant system failures, GAO said.

In DOD's official response to the report, Arthur Money, senior civilian official in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control Communications and Intelligence, said the department "is firmly committed to achieving information superiority" and that the recent reorganization of the ASD/C3I office was conducted to better focus DOD's efforts in this area.

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FMS awards $30M support pact

The Financial Management Service has awarded contracts worth $30 million to support agency programs. The six winning vendors are American Management Systems Inc., PricewaterhouseCoopers, Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc., Soza International Ltd., KPMG Peat Marwick and Andersen Consulting.

The Financial Management Support Contract program is the follow-on to a set of five contracts FMS has been using for research, training and information technology support. The agency used one of the contracts to develop a Lotus Development Corp. Notes database to track bill collections by other federal agencies. All vendors except Soza were incumbents.

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Judiciary plans tech contracts

The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts plans to establish contract vehicles to give the judiciary easy access to computer, telecommunications and audio/visual technologies. In a Commerce Business Daily notice posted last week, the agency said it plans to award contracts to multiple vendors that can support and provide on a nationwide basis courtroom technologies, including videoconferencing as well as evidence and presentation management systems.

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