House panel aims to bolster security law

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The House Science Committee plans to make another push to update a 1989 law that requires civilian agencies to take measures to protect their computer systems, according to Rep. Constance Morella (R-Md.), chairwoman of the Technology Subcommittee of the House Science Committee.

The new bill, which could be introduced as early as next week, would revamp the 10-year-old Computer Security Act. The bill will closely resemble the Computer Security Enhancement Act of 1997, which the House passed only to have it die in the Senate last year, said Morella, speaking at a symposium sponsored by the SmartCard Forum.

Like the 1997 bill, the proposed legislation would tap the National Institute of Standards and Technology as the lead agency for information security. The preceding bill also would have required NIST to promote federal use of commercial off-the-shelf products for civilian security needs.

The committee first began its effort to revamp the existing law to reflect the proliferation of network technology that has left agency data more vulnerable to corruption and theft, Morella said in 1997.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.