Jersey City Nabbed for Unlicensed Software Use

The Jersey City (N.J.) Housing Authority settled recently with the Business Software Alliance to the tune of $175,000 for using unlicensed software on agency computers. The JCHA case is just the latest in a series of BSA anti-piracy sting operations aimed at cracking down on illegal software use among state and local government agencies.

"The JCHA case illustrates that even government agencies are vulnerable to having problems with the software installed on their computers," said Bob Kruger, BSA's vice president of enforcement. BSA nabs many piracy culprits as a result of tips submitted over its anti-piracy hot line (888-NO-PIRACY).

BSA detailed several cases in which BSA has gotten tougher on governments' improper use of software. For example, BSA busted the Los Angeles Unified School District in February for $300,000 for the illegal use of Adobe, Autodesk, Corel, Lotus, Microsoft, Novell and Symantec software. Last July, the city of Philadelphia agreed to pay $121,000.

Also, the association announced that Nevada in late May became the first state to issue an executive order mandating that states comply with strict policies aimed at combating software piracy. President Clinton signed a similar executive order last September outlining anti-piracy policies for the federal government.

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