Hacker groups target Navy sites

In the wake of attacks on FBI World Wide Web sites this month, hacker groups have turned their attention to the Navy.

Last week a hacker defaced the Web site of the Naval Surface Warfare Center's Port Hueneme Division in Louisville, Ky. (www.nswcl.navy.mil), with a mostly obscene message that read in part, "FEDS: You will never stop my FLOW. Nice try, though. Killing my hotmail account and all that. HAHHAHA."

The Dahlgren, Va., division of NSWC helped develop the Co-operative Intrusion Detection Evaluation and Response program (www.nswc.navy.mil/ISSEC/CID), which uses automated tools to track and analyze hacker attacks.

Another hacker—who, based on the postings on the defaced Navy Web sites, may be engaged in a hacker duel with the Port Hueneme attacker—hit the Web site of the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (www.ntsc.navy.mil), Orlando, Fla.

This hacker, who affiliated himself with the group f0rpaxe, said on the defaced Navy page, "We own the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division. FBI spokesman said we were only doing some gov and mil servers [but] we rooted Naval Air Warfare [Center] Training [Systems Division].... We had been exploring entire servers until today."

Navy spokesmen have not returned calls from FCW asking for comment on the attacks.

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