NLC Survey Finds Most Cities Will Have Critical Systems Ready for Y2K

In a National League of Cities survey of 400 cities, 92 percent said all of their critical computer systems will be Year 2000-compliant by Jan. 1.

Brian O'Neill, a Philadelphia councilman and the immediate past president of the NLC, on July 15 will present the findings of the report and other local government preparedness issues to the U.S. Senate's Special Committee on the Year 2000 Technology Problem.

The telephone survey, conducted in April by National Research Inc., also found 92 percent of cities reporting that they have a citywide plan to address problems related to the millennium bug. Seventy percent of those plans include terms requiring Year 2000-compliance by private contractors who provide services to cities and towns.

City leaders said that public safety, water and wastewater systems, utility services, finances and tax records are the top priorities for Year 2000 compliance.

Two-thirds of cities reported having a Year 2000 contingency plan, and 73 percent said they are working with public and private utilities to address the issue, the survey found.

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