Portland Puts City Code and Charter Online

Portland citizens now have online access to their city's nearly 3,000-page city code and its city charter after the mayor and city auditor completed a three-year project to transfer the documents to the Internet.

Mayor Vera Katz and city auditor Gary Blackmer will announce the completion of the project Wednesday at a celebration at Portland's city hall. The 170-page charter is Portland's voter-approved set of rules establishing how the city operates. The 2,894-page city code is comprised of more detailed regulations on everything from civil rights to fire regulations, air pollution to information on signs and awnings.

Before the charter and code were put online, they could be accessed only in a difficult-to-navigate book form. The new Internet-based documents are easy to search and will save the city money in printing and distribution costs, as well as free city staffers' time that was spent searching for responses to questions.

Citizens can access the code at www.ci.portland.or.us/auditor/code.

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