Industry Watch

Sandia unveils encryption chip

Sandia National Laboratories announced earlier this month that it has invented a new computer chip for encrypting large volumes of data sent over high-speed networks. The chip, called the SNL Data Encryption Standard Application Specific Integrated Circuit, can encrypt 6.7 billion bits of data per second - 45 times faster than the rate of similar chips on the market today.

Craig Wilcox, the Sandia engineer who designed the chip, said it will enable scientists to transmit secure computer simulations between laboratories in real time and will be useful for Internet commerce.

Victor Wheatman, a vice president with Dataquest, San Jose, Calif., said the chip probably will be used mostly for scientific computing applications and could be deployed for secure videoconferences. But it will have limited commercial applications, he said.

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Compaq PCs get small

Compaq Computer Corp. last week introduced a new desktop series, the Deskpro EN Series Small Form Factor. Designed for small work places, the EN series is 36 percent smaller than a conventional desktop machine, the company said.

The series is available with Intel Corp. Celeron, Pentium II or Pentium III processors; 64M or 128M of SDRAM; a 6.4G or 10G hard drive; and an optional 24X slimline CD-ROM drive. General Services Administration schedule pricing is not yet available.

Compaq also announced that it is reducing the prices on all its other Deskpro PCs by up to 11 percent, and those price cuts will be reflected in the company's GSA schedule.

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Toshiba announces new notebooks

Toshiba America Information Systems Inc.'s Computer System Division last week announced two new Satellite notebook systems with Intel Corp.'s newest 400 MHz Mobile Pentium II and Mobile Celeron processors and Digital Video Disc drives.

The Satellite 4100XDVD and the Satellite 4090XDVD come with a 14.1-inch display, a 6.4G hard drive, 64M of SDRAM and an integrated V.90/K56flex modem. The notebooks also include Toshiba's 3-D sound system and stereo speakers.

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