Nashville OKs incentive for Dell plant

Nashville, Tenn., officials approved a $46 million incentive package last week for a Dell Computer Corp. plant that will employ at least 3,000 people in a move to make the city a player in the high-tech industry, according to the city's mayor.

Mayor Phil Bredesen embraced the pending construction of the plant and all the opportunities it will bring to Nashville. "I really believe the future of the community is built around high-tech industries," he said. "Nashville has not been a significant player in the past, but the plant will give us a foothold in the industry and allow us to build an infrastructure around Dell."

Dell, based in Round Rock, Texas, is the world's third-ranked computer manufacturer, and the Nashville plant is the company's first on U.S. soil outside Texas. It is the sixth new plant announced by Dell since January 1998.

Featured

  • Defense
    Ryan D. McCarthy being sworn in as Army Secretary Oct. 10, 2019. (Photo credit: Sgt. Dana Clarke/U.S. Army)

    Army wants to spend nearly $1B on cloud, data by 2025

    Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy said lack of funding or a potential delay in the JEDI cloud bid "strikes to the heart of our concern."

  • Congress
    Rep. Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) at the Hack the Capitol conference Sept. 20, 2018

    Jim Langevin's view from the Hill

    As chairman of of the Intelligence and Emerging Threats and Capabilities subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committe and a member of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rhode Island Democrat Jim Langevin is one of the most influential voices on cybersecurity in Congress.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.