Fedwire Briefs

Armstrong moves to CIT post

Anne Armstrong, editor in chief of Federal Computer Week, today is expected to be named president and chief executive officer of the Virginia Center for Innovative Technology. In her new role, Armstrong will oversee the day-to-day management of CIT, a nonprofit organization charged with attracting high-tech business to Virginia and advancing the state's position as a world technology center.

CIT, located in Herndon, Va., has a budget of $15 million and a staff of 50.

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HCFA: Medicaid in Y2K jeopardy

The Health Care Financing Administration this week is expected to release a report concluding that some states are at a high risk of Year 2000 failure for state-run Medicaid programs.

HCFA this summer hired contractors to visit each state and the District of Columbia to assess their progress in becoming Year 2000-compliant and assess the adequacy of their contingency plans should failures occur. Results of the survey will be released in a quarterly report by the Department of Health and Human Services and will be folded into a governmentwide Year 2000 quarterly assessment to be released in September by the Office of Management and Budget.

Specifically, the report separates states into three risk categories: high, medium and low. The high-risk category includes states that are not adequately preparing their Medicaid program for the Year 2000. Medium risk includes states that are doing well but can improve. Low-risk states are states that are essentially risk-free of sustaining date-change problems.

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DOE's nuclear Y2K tests shaky

The nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons will not be affected by the Year 2000 bug because the warheads do not rely on any date-dependent systems or processes to operate properly, according to a recently released General Accounting Office report. However, the report, titled "Nuclear Weapons: Year 2000 Status of the Nation's Nuclear Weapons Stockpile," uncovered evidence that DOE officials failed to document the testing procedures used to verify the status of the warheads. When they did document the testing procedures, the officials failed to have the results and procedures verified by supervisors and other DOE personnel - an accepted scientific process known as peer evaluation.

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