Communities get a C on Y2K report card

Organizations in 37 communities around the nation received an average grade of C on a Year 2000 community report card released by the Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization Center for Y2K&Society.

The grades are based on responses to a 30-question survey asking municipalities to rate their planning, preparedness, health care, public safety, vulnerability and services on a scale of 0 to 5. Grades range widely, based on responses so far. Tucson, Ariz., and Santa Barbara, Calif., each received an F. North Coast, Ore., Providence, R.I., and Nashville, Tenn., each got a D. The state of Utah and Marin County, Calif., were at the head of the class with As.

Most communities indicated they are prepared for the Year 2000 at least in some key areas: assuring the availability of key food stocks and supplies; backup plans for keeping funds flowing to health care institutions if Medicaid, Medicare or private insurance systems experience Year 2000 problems; distributing preparedness information to households; and ensuring nursing homes can care for their clients.

The center has distributed 10,000 copies of the report card nationwide and plans to send out 20,000 more in the next few weeks. Baseline results were received from such cities as New York, San Francisco and Seattle, as well as such smaller communities as Concord, Mass., and Boulder, Colo. Initial respondents included emergency managers, city Year 2000 coordinators, hospitals, community groups and others.

More information is available at www.y2kcenter.org.

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