D.C. police unveil new IT strategy, systems

Washington, D.C., Police Chief Charles Ramsey unveiled on Wednesday a new information technology strategy and a slew of new systems designed to enhance community policing in the District.

Ramsey highlighted five new information and communication systems that the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department will be adopting.

The announcements included the Police Reporting and Information Delivery System (PRIDE), which will provide officers with quick access to a database of such information as criminal histories, warrants, arrests, incidents, calls for service and stolen property. PRIDE also will link the department with national criminal justice databases and information from the U.S. Attorney's Office and other law enforcement agencies.

But Ramsey also made sure the public knew the department would be enacting changes through IT, not just making purchases.

"Let me be clear, I am not talking about buying a bunch of computers," Ramsey said. "I am talking about using technology to fundamentally change the way MPDC works with the community to police the District of Columbia."

Ramsey also announced initiatives to implement a new 311 nonemergency call system and computer-aided dispatch system. The district also plans to equip every squad car with a mobile data computer enabling officers to research and submit reports from the field. A crime mapping system will highlight crime patters in police service areas, districts and regions.

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