Fedwire Briefs

Computer morphing a war crime Falsely communicating misinformation using altered images or documents, a strategy that the Defense Department has considered, would be a war crime, according to a DOD study released last week.The use of information operations tactics, such as deception and perception management, was first publicly discussed last year by John Yurechko, senior-level expert for information operations in the Defense Intelligence Agency's Office of Information Warfare [FCW, May 25, 1998]. During his presentation at a military intelligence conference in Arlington, Va., Yurechko showed how DIA could alter photos and said the same techniques could be applied to videos.WEB EXTRA: For the complete article, go to www.fcw.com/extra.***OMB wants security funded at start The Office of Management and Budget has begun to consider how to better incorporate security into agencies' funding requests for information technology systems, including revising regulations governing how agencies formulate their budgets.At most agencies, security is added to information systems and architectures long after the technology is in place. That leaves agencies with vulnerabilities and management issues that cannot be solved unless security is built into the systems, said Glenn Schlarman, policy analyst at OMB's Office of Information Policy and Technology.Glenn, who spoke at a conference sponsored by the General Services Administration's Office of Information Security, said security must be "woven into the funding" of the entire system.To make security a more fundamental part of agency IT system development starting in fiscal 2001, OMB is studying ways to revise Circular A-11, the document regulating how agencies develop their budget estimates for the president.***Senators want to study privacyTwo senators last week introduced a bill to form a commission to study how effective current federal privacy legislation is and to determine if new laws are necessary.The Privacy Protection Study Commission, made up of nine experts from the legal, civil rights, privacy, business and information technology communities, would conduct an 18-month study of the Freedom of Information Act and the Electronic Freedom of Information Act. The commission would report its findings to the Senate Judiciary Committee and make proposals about the next step to take.

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