GSA's acquisition policy chief loses battle with cancer

Memorial services were held on Dec. 3 in Takoma Park, Md., for Ida M. Ustad, deputy associate administrator for acquisition policy at the General Services Administration.

Ustad died on Nov. 29. She had been struggling with cancer.

Ustad, a native of South Dakota, began her GSA career as a clerical assistant in Kansas City, Mo., in 1971. During her tenure with the agency, she served in various regional and central-office management positions, working her way to the top of GSA's Office of Acquisition Policy in 1994.

In her role as deputy associate administrator for acquisition policy at GSA, she oversaw programs designed to move more federal acquisition information to the Internet. She also oversaw the Clinton administration's execution of laws such as the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994, the Federal Acquisition Reform Act of 1996 and the Information Technology Management Reform Act of 1996.

Ustad served as a member of the vice president's National Performance Review team. She also won awards including the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorious Executive, as well as Vice President Al Gore's Hammer Award for government reinvention.

Ustad's family has requested that memorial contributions be made to the American Cancer Society, 11331 Amherst Avenue, Silver Spring, Md., 20902 and to the Children's Care Hospital&School, 2501 West 26th Street, Sioux Falls, S.D., 57105-2498.

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