Ohio's New CIO Outlines Top Priorities

Ohio Gov. Bob Taft last week named Gregory Jackson chief information officer and assistant director of the Department of Administrative Services effective Jan. 10. The new CIO has already established his top three priorities: electronic government, IT work force recruitment and improving the state's procurement process.

"Electronic government is definitely Number One," Jackson said. "There are a number of agencies that have started some initiatives, but we want to put those together into a strategic plan."

As CIO within Administrative Services, Jackson will oversee all state activities related to information technologies and will seek to ensure that continued advancements are made through research, analysis and education.

Jackson said filling the more than 60 unfilled IT-related jobs in Ohio's government is another top priority because "in order to launch the e-business initiatives that we want to, we need to proceed with getting these positions filled and not contracting them out."

Third on Jackson's list is improving Ohio's procurement process through the integration of master contracts.

"Multiple agencies are seeking individual solutions with similar components," and the idea is to have them all operate off a centralized contract, he said.

Jackson now works for IBM as a senior consultant to various government clients, including Washington, D.C.'s Office of Tax and Revenue and the Wisconsin Department of Revenue. Previously he was deputy director of management information systems in Ohio's Department of Taxation.

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