Postal Service names new technology chief

Postmaster General William Henderson on Tuesday appointed Peter Jacobson as the agency's new chief technology officer.

Jacobson, who is returning to the Postal Service after five years in the private sector, will be responsible for managing the agency's overall technology base as well as developing new technologies to improve productivity and business development.

Jacobson, who first joined USPS in 1974, replaces Norm Lorentz who recently left to join earthweb.com, a business-to-business portal that provides information about IT issues, products and services.

Jacobson most recently served as president and chief executive officer of the parcel consolidation and distribution company, Paxis LLC. He was also vice president of worldwide business development sales, marketing and logistics operations at Lockheed Martin Corp.

During his 24 years with USPS, Jacobson served as an assistant postmaster general of engineering, regional postmaster general for the former Northeast Region and senior vice president of processing and distribution.

As chief technology officer Jacobson will focus on:

* Deploying technology that will support USPS' strategic plan.

* Developing new systems to provide real-time data and cost analysis of moving mail.

* Guiding USPS in its application of computers and telecommunication systems.

* Deploying strategic plans that will focus on the marketplace and improving the value of USPS services.

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