Navy focuses IT training on info ops

The Navy has revamped its training program for information technology

technicians and officers, focusing on the skills required to conduct

network-centric warfare and information operations.

The Navy also has started developing basic computer training for all

non-IT enlisted and officer personnel, according to a message from Rear

Adm. Richard Mayo, the Navy's director of command, control and

communications.

The new Communications, Information Systems and Networks training

program begins with a basic information systems technician school with a

curriculum focused on the commercial technologies used in Navy projects

such as the joint Pacific and Atlantic Fleet Information Technology for

the 21st Century.

A new journeyman school will offer a network security vulnerability

course designed to produce IT professionals with the skills needed to

protect and defend networks.

Mayo's organization — along with the National Security Agency and its

Navy counterpart, the Naval Security Group — have formed a partnership

to offer courses "vital to Information Age operations," according to the

Navy-wide message Mayo sent Jan. 21.

The Navy also has set up an "IT University" in conjunction with

Tidewater Community College in Norfolk, Va., to train graduates of the

basic course. The new broad-based training program includes mobile

training teams with new curriculum for Fleet units and more than 300

World Wide Web-based courses for Navy and Marine IT professionals.

Mayo's message said that the Navy's deployment of networks and IT

continues at "a remarkable pace" which requires "robust training

activity at all levels to ride this bow wave."

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