Pentagon budget takes aim at wage disparity

The Defense Department put the troops first in its proposed fiscal 2001 budget. The Pentagon said in a statement that its $277.5 billion budget proposal "continues the department's emphasis on the quality of life of its military people — with special attention to pay, housing and health care."

The new budget includes a 3.7 percent pay boost for military personnel, or one-half of a percentage point above the forecasted rate of civilian wage growth. The 2001 budget also proposes a basic housing allowance which should reduce out-of-pocket costs for service families living off base by anywhere from 15 percent to 19 percent relative to nationwide housing prices. The Pentagon wants to completely eliminate the differential between on- and off-base housing costs by 2005, but warns that this comes with a total price tag of $3 billion over the next four years.

On the health care front, DOD's 2001 budget contains funding to eliminate copayments for active-duty family members enrolled in the Tricare program while at the same time extending Tricare to active-duty family members living far from military health care facilities.

Featured

  • Workforce
    White House rainbow light shutterstock ID : 1130423963 By zhephotography

    White House rolls out DEIA strategy

    On Tuesday, the Biden administration issued agencies a roadmap to guide their efforts to develop strategic plans for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility (DEIA), as required under a as required under a June executive order.

  • Defense
    software (whiteMocca/Shutterstock.com)

    Why DOD is so bad at buying software

    The Defense Department wants to acquire emerging technology faster and more efficiently. But will its latest attempts to streamline its processes be enough?

Stay Connected