Submariners get their turn

The Navy wants to use microsimulation in training areas besides aviation.

The CD-ROM the Navy issued last month with the customized version of Microsoft

Corp.'s Flight Simulator also included a simulation of an attack submarine.

In a case of life imitating art, the simulation software, Jane's 688

(I) Hunter Killer for Underseas Warfare from software developer Electronics

Arts, will be used by Naval personnel on board the real 688-class attack

nuclear submarine, said Scott Dunlop, head of the Assessment Project Office

for the Chief of Naval Education and Training in Pensacola, Fla.

The 688 simulation will help the Navy give junior officers a more complete

understanding of the vessel. "It will give them a feeling on how the fire

control system interacts with the navigation system, for example," Dunlap

said. "We're more interested in it for the methodology it teaches than the

simulation."

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