Hoosiers have say in Web site design

Indiana is giving its Hoosiers an opportunity to contribute to a redesign of the state's World Wide Web site.

The state is revamping Access Indiana to make it easier for people to locate information and a growing roster of online services.

As part of the initiative, Indiana is asking state residents to submit new design ideas for the Access Indiana logo. The logo will appear on the home page as well as letterhead and other documents. The existing logo debuted with the Web site in 1995.

"The whole idea is to allow the public to tell us how they would like the state to be perceived," said Laura Lindenbusch, director of marketing for Access Indiana.

The contest, running through April 14, also should help the state build awareness of the Web site, she said. Access Indiana provides links to court rulings, state legislation and state databases, as well as services such as license plate renewal and electronic tax filing.

A panel of judges will select the five best submissions, and then the public will vote for the top choice. Contestants must be at least 18 years old.

Indiana also is running a contest, open to fourth graders, to draw pictures to be used as screen savers that Access Indiana users can download. "In Indiana, fourth graders study history, so we wanted to give them the chance to say what is so great about the state," Lindenbusch said.

A judging committee will pick the five best images, all of which will be scanned into screen-saver software and posted on the Web site.

Indiana hopes to debut the new Access Indiana design, with its new logo and screen-savers, in June.

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