Clinton budget boosts government IT

President Clinton's 2001 budget request includes $39.7 billion for information technology — a 4 percent increase compared with last year.

In an analysis of Clinton's $1.84 billion budget request, Federal Sources Inc. said civilian agencies would receive an overall boost of about 9 percent, with several agencies receiving much more.

Leading the pack is the Department of Veterans affairs, which would receive a 35 percent increase; the Labor Department, 33 percent; the Treasury Department, 19 percent; the Transportation Department, 18 percent; the Department of Justice, 14 percent; and the Education Department, 12 percent.

The Commerce Department 's IT budget would decline by 10 percent, but that is largely because of the completion of the census, which received most of its money in previous years.

The president's budget, which still must be approved by Congress, is the strongest request yet to promote electronic government. Funding for IT cuts across virtually every government agency for new programs and to enhance old ones.

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