IBM speeds up DB2 database

IBM Corp. recently introduced the latest version of its DB2 database, which now comes with built-in decision-support features and key enhancements designed to speed up its performance with World Wide Web-based applications.

IBM's DB2 Universal Database Version 7.1 is the company's first offering to use an in-memory processing technique to speed up text searches for Web applications. By moving all textual information to be searched into memory at one time, DB2 can complete searches much faster than the traditional way, which is to move blocks of data to memory, search the text and then add more data until the search request is satisfied, according to Jeff Jones, senior program manager for IBM's data management solutions.

The new DB2 database also provides more convenient data warehousing and data analysis capabilities by integrating Hyperion Solutions Corp.'s Essbase online analytical processing (OLAP) software. The OLAP technology allows users to access, analyze and disseminate data quickly from the local DB2 database, as well as perform extended searches on external databases and servers.

"The heterogeneous query capability allows users to unite data, look across it and define it," Jones said. "The key here is the integrated analysis capabilities that come with the package now, when before you had to buy them separately."

An option called DB2 Spatial Extender enables heightened analysis with spatial data, such as longitude and latitude measurements.

The beta release of DB2 Version 7.1 will be available for download by the end of this month. Pricing will be announced at the time of availability. The product will be generally available within the next two months on a variety of Unix, Linux and Microsoft platforms.

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