Oklahoma Invites Students to Play Games

An interactive software program that combines music, video and computers will be used to challenge Oklahoma students to think about the consequences of their actions.

The game, called "Central High," was unveiled last week at Edmond's Central Middle School. It's slated to become part of the curriculum at all of the state's public schools.

Developed by Tulsa-based Destiny Interactive Inc., "Central High" is a CD-ROM program that presents topics ranging from drug use to teen suicide in more than 36 scenarios. Students must make the right decisions in dealing with the situations to successfully complete a scenario.

Destiny Interactive will provide six "Central High" CD-ROMs for every public school in the state, and additional scenarios will soon be available on the company's World Wide Web site.

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