High-tech work force growing

All 50 states have added high-tech jobs and the national industry work force grew to 5 million in 1999, according to a report by the American Electronics Association and Nasdaq Stock Market.

The report, "Cyberstates 4.0: A State-By-State Overview of the High Technology Industry," is based on Census Bureau data. It assessed the industry by employment, wages and exports.

California, Texas, Virginia, Colorado and Georgia led the nation in high-tech job creation. California has the most high-tech jobs with 835,000, and 193,000 new high-tech jobs were created in California from 1993 to 1998. Texas, with 411,000 industry workers, was second overall, and 132,000 new jobs were created in Texas in those five years.

"What this indicates is that the high-technology industry is not just in one area or region," said Marc Brailov, AEA's public communication director. "It's coast-to-coast and has become a true national industry."

Following California and Texas with the highest numbers of high-tech workers are New York (329,000) and Illinois (218,000). Colorado has the highest concentration of high-tech workers, with 84 per 1,000 workers.

The report also found:

    * The average annual wage for the high-tech industry was $26,000 more than the average private-sector wage. The highest wages are in Washington ($106,000), New Jersey ($69,000) and California ($67,000).

    * The total high-tech payroll was $279 billion in 1998, up from $182 billion in 1993 (adjusted for inflation).

    * California led in all but one industry segment; New York was first in photonics. Virginia was second in software services, and Minnesota ranked second in electromedical equipment.

More information can be found at www.aeanet.org.

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