FBI doesn't share cyberinfo, exec says

Despite the boss' suggestion that agencies and industry should share information

to defend against cyberattacks, the FBI does not play along, according to

a senior executive with an information technology security company.

Phillip Lacombe, a senior vice president with Veridian Corp., remarked on

the FBI's unwillingness to share data after being told that Attorney General

Janet Reno urged industry leaders to work cooperatively with government

agencies to defend against cybercrime and cyberterrorism.

The government needs to stop directing solutions and build partnerships

with industry to develop them, Lacombe told listeners at the GovTech conference

June 20 in Washington, D.C.

The day before, Reno had told industry officials that they — not government — held the solutions.

Lacombe seemed amused.

"Her agency is the worst" at cooperating, he said. The bureau's determination

to have information flow in only one direction — in — prevents mutual cooperation,

either between the bureau and industry or the bureau and other industries,

according to Lacombe.

"That's why the National Infrastructure Protection Center is not going to

work — it's all FBI," he said.

The NIPC is the bureau's in-house branch for combating cyberthreats to the

country's critical networks. According to the Justice Department, the center's

mission includes developing a working relationship with industry leaders

and establishing a means of sharing information between the public and private

sectors.

FBI officials declined comment on Lacombe's remarks, but referenced testimony

given by FBI Director Louis Freeh to a Senate Appropriations subcommittee

Feb. 16: "Much attention has been given to the need to create mechanisms

for sharing information with the private sector," Freeh said. "The NIPC

has build a track record for doing this over the past two years with concrete

results."

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