Mo. launches 'Most Wanted' fugitive site

Missouri recently launched a "Most Wanted" Internet site (www.missourinet.com/wanted) that law enforcement agents hope will help them catch fugitives more quickly.

It's a collaborative effort between the Department of Public Safety and MissouriNet, the state's World Wide Web site. Participating law enforcement agencies include the State Highway Patrol, the St. Louis and Kansas City offices of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the U. S. Marshals Service.

The site presents pictures of the day's most wanted as well as identifying information and charges against them. By clicking on the fugitive's name the viewer can enlarge the photo and obtain a name and number for reporting any relevant information.

The fugitives are not ranked in order but must be considered "top fugitives." They also must have committed (or be a suspect in) a serious crime in Missouri or be believed to be traveling to Missouri. The site makes explicit that fugitives identified as suspects in a crime are innocent until a court proves them otherwise.

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