Army awards C4I system to Motorola

The Army has awarded Motorola Inc. a $49.7 million contract to build the

Joint Services Work Station, the company announced Tuesday.

JSWS supports intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and situational

awareness missions. It is described as a real-time, multisensor command,

control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) system.

The system processes and displays information from multiple sources, including

unmanned aerial vehicles, synthetic aperture radars and various intelligence

systems.

JSWS is a mobile system packed in its own transit case, and it can support

a wide range of global missions, including wartime battlefield management,

crisis management, peacekeeping operations, the war on drugs and contingency

operations. It also is said to be suited for targeting and battlefield visualization.

In addition, the system uses the same software as the ground station for

the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System, which helps aircraft

locate, track and attack enemy units.

"This will significantly increase interoperability of all forces through

a common operating picture," said Hank Wollman, JSWS program manager, in

a statement.

The system also has been combat-proven in Kosovo according to Mark Fried,

corporate vice president and general manager of the Motorola Integrated

Electronic Systems division. "The JSWS will allow joint service commanders

to receive data on the same platform and see situations with a reliability

never before possible and to make decisions with certainty," Fried said.

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