Take it slow

The California Internet Voting Task Force advises "evolutionary rather than

revolutionary change" when it comes to casting ballots online.

A four-step process would permit limited Internet voting and maximum

oversight until election officials are more confident that Internet voting

can be fraud-proofed.

Step 1: Internet voting would begin with voting on computers set up

at polling places. Besides enabling close monitoring by election officials,

this would permit thorough testing of voting systems.

Step 2: Voters would be able to use any polling place. Logging on to

the election Web site would automatically provide each voter with the appropriate

ballot regardless of location.

Step 3: Voters would be allowed to vote from "unattended Internet voting

machines" placed throughout the election district. Voters would be issued

a means of electronic identification, such as digital signatures or personal

identification numbers.

Step 4: Voting would be allowed from home, office or anywhere voters

have Internet access. The task force recommends extensive security measures,

including requiring voters to load a clean operating system to protect against

attacks.

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