A how-to for reducing agency paper

A group of agencies released a model guide last month designed to help agencies

develop electronic government plans under the Government Paperwork Elimination

Act.

Under GPEA, agencies must enable citizens to interact with the government

electronically whenever possible. Agencies must comply by October 2003,

but there is a more immediate deadline: Implementation plans are due at

the Office of Management and Budget by Oct. 31.

The Social Security Administration, the General Services Administration

and the federal CIO Council's E-government Committee developed the planning

guide and model report under the direction of OMB to help agencies respond

to next month's deadline.

The guide helps agencies prepare their plans by providing "examples

and practical considerations for agencies in complying with OMB's GPEA guidance

and planning instructions."

The guide outlines steps agencies should take in preparing their GPEA

plans, such as identifying candidates for electronic reporting and transactions,

and provides examples, mostly from SSA.

"The data call is the first step in trying to wrestle with transactions

to the public," said Rich Kellett, director of GSA's Emerging IT Policies

Division. Starting Oct. 16, Kellett will be detailed to OMB to work on GPEA

issues.

The impact of GPEA is wide-ranging, Kellett said. The data call requires

agencies to link their plans with their information-collection budgets.

The inventory includes more than 3,500 records, such as tax forms and filings

to the SEC.

"This really is big and affects everyone." he said.

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