Digital library to open databases

Connecticut has sent out a request for proposals to create a digital library

for the state's residents.

Citizens will be able to view information through a single Internet

access point, to be called the Connecticut Digital Library, according to

Bill Sullivan, spokesman for the Connecticut State Library.

"We're trying to make available commercial, full-text databases to every

citizen in the state," Sullivan said.

About 1,800 libraries, universities, elementary and high schools, hospitals,

historical societies, museums and state government agencies will have access

to the digital library. The databases will include general interest, general

academic, business, and consumer health information.

Sullivan said that because databases are expensive, many smaller public

libraries are unable to afford them, even at discounted rates. With the

statewide purchase of the database and with information consolidated into

one access point, he said it also could save money for state agencies.

Gov. John Rowland signed legislation several months ago allocating $2

million for the project.

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