Vanguard launches fed subsidiary

Computer security firm Vanguard Integrity Professionals on Thursday announced

the launch of Vanguard Federal Systems to market advanced security solutions

and services to the federal government.

Vanguard Federal, a wholly owned subsidiary of its parent company, will

build off VIP's current federal customers, which include NASA, the Defense

Information Systems Agency, the Internal Revenue Service and the Agriculture

Department, according to the company.

In conjunction with the announcement, Vanguard, Orange, Calif., named

Robert Filler as director of federal systems. Before joining the new company,

Filler worked for IBM Corp. for 11 years in sales and management roles.

Prior to that, he was a flight officer, instructor and division officer

in the Navy.

Filler said the plan to launch a federal subsidiary had been in the

works for the past six months to a year, and he formally signed on in August.

He expects Vanguard Federal, which will be based in Las Vegas, to have at

least five or six full-time employees by the end of the year, with plans

for expanding that team in the near future.

"The idea is to go after a number of federal agencies to expand our

market," Filler said. "We've been working with federal agencies for a number

of years but had never gone out to establish a formal federal division.

This shows we're more serious about doing business with the government and

are going to make a concerted effort to go after that business."

Vanguard's security software products run on several hardware platforms,

including mainframe, Unix, AS/400 and Microsoft Corp. Windows NT. The company

also offers security consulting and training.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Boy looks under voting booth at Ventura Polling Station for California primary Ventura County, California. Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

    FBI breach notice rules lauded by states, but some want more

    A recent policy change by the FBI would notify states when their local election systems are hacked, but some state officials and lawmakers want the feds to inform a broader range of stakeholders in the election ecosystem.

  • paths (cybrain/Shutterstock.com)

    Does strategic planning help organizations?

    Steve Kelman notes growing support for strategic planning efforts -- and the steps agencies take to keep those plans relevant.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.