EzGov founder dies in fire

Bryan Mundy, co-founder and chairman of e-government software and services

provider EzGov Inc., died Monday of smoke inhalation in an early morning

fire at his home in Atlanta.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but it appears a smoke

alarm failed to alert him because of a dead battery, said Jolene Freeman,

a spokeswoman for the Atlanta Fire Department.

Mundy, 36, and Ed Trimble formed the company in 1999 to create portals for

citizen-to-government transactions, such as paying parking tickets online.

"What we are going to miss most about Bryan is his inspiration, passion

and convictions about e-government," said Trimble, EzGov's president and

chief executive officer.

EzGov offers a full-range of services. It can host agency portals, help

agencies build their own portals, provide software that ties customer-driven

Web applications to back-end agency databases. The company has more than

65 state and local government clients, and is moving into the federal market.

The privately held company has raised $31 million in venture capital and

is close to securing an additional $20 million to $25 million, Trimble said.

While some e-government service providers are experiencing cutbacks, EzGov

has maintained staff levels of about 150, opened offices in Europe and expects

to reach profitability in the first quarter of 2002, Trimble said.

Mundy previously worked as a technology consultant for accounting firm Arthur

Andersen. Most recently, he was chief strategist for InterArch Technologies,

an Atlanta-based company specializing in e-commerce solutions.

Mundy was an avid mountain climber who had scaled five of the tallest peaks

in the world. "We never imagined it would be something like this," Trimble

said, referring to Mundy's death.

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.

Featured

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

  • Shutterstock image.

    A 'minibus' appropriations package could be in the cards

    A short-term funding bill is expected by Sept. 30 to keep the federal government operating through early December, but after that the options get more complicated.

  • Defense Secretary Ash Carter speaks at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in San Francisco

    DOD launches new tech hub in Austin

    The DOD is opening a new Defense Innovation Unit Experimental office in Austin, Texas, while Congress debates legislation that could defund DIUx.

  • Shutterstock image.

    Merged IT modernization bill punts on funding

    A House panel approved a new IT modernization bill that appears poised to pass, but key funding questions are left for appropriators.

  • General Frost

    Army wants cyber capability everywhere

    The Army's cyber director said cyber, electronic warfare and information operations must be integrated into warfighters' doctrine and training.

  • Rising Star 2013

    Meet the 2016 Rising Stars

    FCW honors 30 early-career leaders in federal IT.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group