EzGov founder dies in fire

Bryan Mundy, co-founder and chairman of e-government software and services

provider EzGov Inc., died Monday of smoke inhalation in an early morning

fire at his home in Atlanta.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation, but it appears a smoke

alarm failed to alert him because of a dead battery, said Jolene Freeman,

a spokeswoman for the Atlanta Fire Department.

Mundy, 36, and Ed Trimble formed the company in 1999 to create portals for

citizen-to-government transactions, such as paying parking tickets online.

"What we are going to miss most about Bryan is his inspiration, passion

and convictions about e-government," said Trimble, EzGov's president and

chief executive officer.

EzGov offers a full-range of services. It can host agency portals, help

agencies build their own portals, provide software that ties customer-driven

Web applications to back-end agency databases. The company has more than

65 state and local government clients, and is moving into the federal market.

The privately held company has raised $31 million in venture capital and

is close to securing an additional $20 million to $25 million, Trimble said.

While some e-government service providers are experiencing cutbacks, EzGov

has maintained staff levels of about 150, opened offices in Europe and expects

to reach profitability in the first quarter of 2002, Trimble said.

Mundy previously worked as a technology consultant for accounting firm Arthur

Andersen. Most recently, he was chief strategist for InterArch Technologies,

an Atlanta-based company specializing in e-commerce solutions.

Mundy was an avid mountain climber who had scaled five of the tallest peaks

in the world. "We never imagined it would be something like this," Trimble

said, referring to Mundy's death.

The Fed 100

Save the date for 28th annual Federal 100 Awards Gala.

Featured

  • computer network

    How Einstein changes the way government does business

    The Department of Commerce is revising its confidentiality agreement for statistical data survey respondents to reflect the fact that the Department of Homeland Security could see some of that data if it is captured by the Einstein system.

  • Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Army photo by Monica King. Jan. 26, 2017.

    Mattis mulls consolidation in IT, cyber

    In a Feb. 17 memo, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told senior leadership to establish teams to look for duplication across the armed services in business operations, including in IT and cybersecurity.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DHS vague on rules for election aid, say states

    State election officials had more questions than answers after a Department of Homeland Security presentation on the designation of election systems as critical U.S. infrastructure.

  • Org Chart Stock Art - Shutterstock

    How the hiring freeze targets millennials

    The government desperately needs younger talent to replace an aging workforce, and experts say that a freeze on hiring doesn't help.

  • Shutterstock image: healthcare digital interface.

    VA moves ahead with homegrown scheduling IT

    The Department of Veterans Affairs will test an internally developed scheduling module at primary care sites nationwide to see if it's ready to service the entire agency.

  • Shutterstock images (honglouwawa & 0beron): Bitcoin image overlay replaced with a dollar sign on a hardware circuit.

    MGT Act poised for a comeback

    After missing in the last Congress, drafters of a bill to encourage cloud adoption are looking for a new plan.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group