Presidential jet set may go on Web

Arguing that the public has a right to know who's flying on Air Force One and Air Force Two at taxpayer expense, Rep. Christopher Shays (R-Conn.) is proposing a law that requires the president to post passengers' names on the Internet.

The provision, which is part of the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act of 2001, would make it possible to compare lists of who has been jetting with the president and vice president with lists of those making campaign contributions, a spokeswoman for Shays said.

This isn't the first time the legislation has come before Congress. In 1997, the House passed it as an amendment to campaign reform legislation, but the reform bill failed to pass.

The president would have 30 days after a flight to post the names "of any non-government person who is a passenger" on the presidential or vice presidential planes. Specifically excluded from such lists would be members of the military, any employees of the United States, and members of Congress.

While eager to post presidential passenger lists for all to see, the House campaign reform legislation omits any requirement for placing Congress's financial information on the Internet. For years, House members have resisted posting online their personal financial disclosure reports, statements of disbursement showing how they spend their office allowances, and lobbyist disclosure reports.

Shays' legislation leaves it up to the president where on the Internet his passengers' names would be posted.

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