WolfPack project moving forward

Proposals are due in mid-March for the Defense Department's $40 million WolfPack program, an effort to develop advanced electronic warfare capabilities.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency recently released two solicitations for the WolfPack program, which is aimed at "developing technologies that will enable radio frequency spectrum dominance against advanced communications and radar systems in the tactical battlespace," according to a Feb. 26 DARPA announcement.

"DARPA expects that advanced radar systems and future tactical communications systems using frequency-agile, low-power, packet-networked technologies will challenge traditional, stand-off electronic warfare approaches. The WolfPack program intends to develop technologies and architectures for ground-based, close-proximity, distributed, networked systems that will augment existing electronic warfare systems," the announcement states. "The WolfPack concept envisions portable and handheld applications; the program is particularly interested in approaches that minimize size, weight, power and cost."

The current solicitations are for the program's second and third developmental phases. The second phase is designed to develop unique, high-risk, high-pay-off technologies, and the third phase is designed to define systems, develop component technology and refine the architecture.

The first phase assessed the validity of the WolfPack concept. The fourth and final phase, which will begin in 2003, will require up to three contractor teams, potentially teamed with phase two developers, to develop and test a prototype WolfPack system.

The solicitations can be viewed at www.darpa.mil/ato/solicit.htm.

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