Briefs

NSF preps scholarship grants

The federal Scholarship for Service program β€” an initiative started by the Clinton administration to attract new information security professionals to government work in exchange for tuition β€” is progressing on schedule, according to National Science Foundation officials.

NSF heads up the first step of the SFS program β€” awarding grants to colleges and universities that are teaching information security students. The agency is reviewing the schools' proposals, which were due by Jan. 24, and plans to award grants by June, officials said.

The grants will pay for the scholarships, which the schools will award to individual students. The institutions will also use the money to maintain and improve their information security curricula and to help other schools create new programs.

SFS is part of the larger Federal Cyber Service program, which is designed to improve the overall level of security expertise in government.

OPM telecommuting guide out

The Office of Personnel Management last month released a guide on its Web site designed to help agencies formulate their telecommuting policies and increase telecommuting participation in agencies.

By law, agencies are required to establish telecommuting policies. In addition, OPM must ensure that 25 percent of the total federal workforce is covered by these policies by April, with the rest of the federal workforce covered during the next three years.

The OPM guide includes sample telecommuting agreements, references and a briefing kit with visual aids and talking points. In a Feb. 9 memo, OPM told agencies to report back to it by April 2 on their progress, plans and any barriers related to telecommuting.

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