New SEC site built for speed

The Securities and Exchange Commission relaunched its Web site Feb. 26, deleting some graphics in favor of shorter download times and redesigning the overall page for quicker navigation.

The site (www.sec.gov) is home to EDGAR, the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval system. EDGAR is a database of corporate filings and receives about 1 million hits daily, according to Laura Unger, who was recently named acting chairwoman of the SEC.

The new page arranges information for specific types of users, she said. In addition to EDGAR, categories include investor information, staff interpretations on policy, regulatory actions, litigation and SEC news and public information.

The redesigned site also includes two new search engines.

As more and more people turn to the SEC for information on investments, companies and regulations, it's important that the agency can provide the information as quickly and as efficiently as possible, Unger said.

"As technology continues to revolutionize investing, it's critical that we keep pace," she said.

Computer Systems Management Inc., Alexandria, Va., developed the site for the SEC.

Shankar Pillai, president and chief executive officer of the company, said the agency wanted a design that was both functional and attractive for "a broad user base...one that ranges from law firms using the latest technologies to individual investors with older browsers and slower Internet connections."

The new site was tested before its launch to ensure that it "reacted well" with various systems, Pillai said.

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