Marines delay move to Windows 2000

After storming the beach of Microsoft Corp. operating systems and messaging from 1999 to 2000 by deploying Windows NT Server 4.0 and Exchange Server 5.5, the Marines wanted to continue their assault with a move to Windows 2000 within the next two years.

But as a result of Electronic Data Systems Corp.'s plans to add Windows 2000 to its Navy Marine Corps Intranet procurement in 2002, the Marines recently decided to delay their move, said Capt. Pete Mitchell, a Marine Corps headquarters spokesman.

The Marines plan to use NMCI to outsource their voice, video and data services starting in fiscal 2003.

Windows 2000, the upgraded version of Windows NT 4.0 for PCs and servers, would give the Marines advanced directory services for managing users, computers and other resources through its Active Directory feature. The software also would enable the Corps to surpass NT 4.0's limit of 40,000 accounts per domain for a master account. Administrators also can delegate control to users and groups throughout the directory.

The delay in the Windows 2000 migration means that EDS and its subcontractors will deal with any problems that arise, such as hardware upgrades, backward compatibility, archiving messages and user training.

The Marines formerly used Banyan Worldwide's StreetTalk for messaging and Banyan's VINES operating system for 10 years, largely because of their ability to build a global address directory within StreetTalk.

In 1999, though, the Corps dropped StreetTalk 8.5 and Vines 8.5 in favor of Microsoft products in part because of concern for Banyan products' abilities to operate in a joint environment. In addition, a larger number of integrators and service providers work with Microsoft compared with Banyan, and Banyan did not have a Defense Message System product.

In 1999, Banyan changed its name to ePresence Inc. and stopped issuing new versions of its software.

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