Letter to the Editor

E-commerce was supposed to change the federal marketplace.

Although many limitations still exist on the government side of e-commerce (single procurements of $2,500, similar commodity limits, hazmat requirements, audio/visual limitations, photographic equipment rules, etc.), all the reluctance is not on the part of the government.

As a bankcard buyer, I first try the Internet for sources of the items that I'm buying. Many suppliers have online catalogs: Some are view-only, some require a user ID and password, others do not have a search by part number capability, still others cannot process a government sales tax exemption. Some require a faxed signature.

It is still a growing field, and I look forward to being able to order all my materials via the Internet.

Name withheld upon request

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