Fedwire

DOE rapped on old computers

A review of how the Energy Department deals with excess property showed computers that still had readable data and a lack of policies for handling used gear.

A random sample of 40 computers in DOE's excess property holding area found three with recoverable data, according to a General Accounting Office report. GAO said DOE "does not have standardized instructions, verification procedures, or training for agency or contract employees on how to properly clear excessed computers."

Joseph Mahaley, acting director of the Office of Security and Emergency Operations at DOE, agreed with the findings and said efforts are under way to solve the problems.

Site details federal spending

The Center for National Policy, a Washington, D.C., research organization, is creating a Web site that will show in detail how the federal government spends money in the nation's congressional districts.

Analysis of spending in three states — Ohio, Michigan and Illinois — has been completed through the project, called "What Government Does" (www.solfopro.com/CNP).

Spending information for the rest of the country could be online in six months, said center president Maureen Steinbruner.

No privacy czar for Bush

President Bush will not name a privacy adviser, according to an official at the Office of Management and Budget, where President Clinton's "chief counselor for privacy" resided.

"The position has expired," said Lauren Steinfeld, a policy analyst in OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. The counselor's responsibilities will be transferred to OIRA, she said.

In 1999, Clinton named law professor Peter Swire as his privacy adviser.

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Boy looks under voting booth at Ventura Polling Station for California primary Ventura County, California. Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

    FBI breach notice rules lauded by states, but some want more

    A recent policy change by the FBI would notify states when their local election systems are hacked, but some state officials and lawmakers want the feds to inform a broader range of stakeholders in the election ecosystem.

  • paths (cybrain/Shutterstock.com)

    Does strategic planning help organizations?

    Steve Kelman notes growing support for strategic planning efforts -- and the steps agencies take to keep those plans relevant.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.