Roster change

President Bush recently announced his intent to nominate several people to join his administration. They include:

  • Bruce Mehlman, to be assistant secretary of Commerce for technology policy. Mehlman has served as telecommunications policy counsel for Cisco Systems Inc. since 1999. Before joining Cisco Systems, he was general counsel and policy director for the House Republican Conference and served as general counsel for the National Republican Congressional Committee from 1996 to 1999. Mehlman will head the Office of Technology Policy, which is part of the Commerce Department's Technology Administration.
  • Douglas Jay Feith, to be undersecretary of Defense for policy. He is the managing attorney with Feith and Zell, P.C., in Washington, D.C. He served from 1984 to 1986 as deputy assistant secretary of Defense for negotiations policy and was special counsel to assistant secretary of Defense Richard Perle from 1982 to 1984.
  • Mary Kirtley Waters, to be assistant secretary of Agriculture for congressional relations. She is the senior director and legislative counsel for ConAgra Foods, where she has served since 1986. Before joining ConAgra, she served as a legislative assistant for Congressman Larry Hopkins from 1984 to 1986.

Eric Brewer, co-founder and chief scientist of Inktomi Corp., and David Barram, former administrator of the General Services Administration, late last month were awarded the federal CIO Council's Azimuth Awards for 2001. Brewer and Barram were honored for the innovative and far-reaching development of the FirstGov Web site, the one-stop portal for citizens to access information from the federal government.

The awards recognize the individual's vision and direction-setting work during the preceding year in support of federal information technology efforts.

For more on FirstGov, see "Treasury CIO promotes expanded fed portal" [FCW.com, March 19, 2001]

Jeff Grove, former staff director of the House Science Committee's Technology Subcommittee, has been named director of the Association for Computing Machinery's public policy office in Washington, D.C. The Public Policy Office will work closely with ACM's committee on U.S. public policy issues related to IT. ACM is the world's oldest educational and scientific society, dedicated to serving the needs of computing and IT professionals and students worldwide.

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