DOD creates cybercrimes position

The Defense Department has created a senior executive service position to oversee its computer forensics laboratory and investigator training program.

The 30-day Office of Personnel Management notice for an executive director of the Defense Cybercrimes Center will come out within a week, said Brig. Gen. Francis Taylor, commanding general of the Air Force Office of Special Investigations.

The director will supervise up to 80 employees, manage a $12.5 million budget and lay out a long-term strategy for the center. In addition to some technical expertise, candidates for the director's job should have "proven management and leadership ability in programs of national importance," Taylor said. Prior DOD or law enforcement experience is important but not required.

"We want to cast our net wider in government, rather than just Defense," Taylor said. He would like the director to turn the forensics laboratory and training program into an institute that would serve as a resource for academics, private industry and graduate students.

The Defense Cybercrimes Center director can help the Department of Defense Computer Investigations Training Program implement distance-learning technology so that the nearly 3,800 special agents can take the classes, which last from two days to six weeks.

DCITP is part of the Justice Department's National Cybercrime Training Partnership, a collaborative effort among federal, state and local law enforcement agencies that are involved in computer crime investigations training.

Taylor, who retires July 1, will turn command over to Air Force Brig. Gen. (select) Leonard Patterson on May 11.

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