Tool puts clamps on Web content

Government agencies seeking to control access to and the use of information across the Internet can find help with today's launch of NetRecall from Authentica Inc.

NetRecall, which has generated interest from federal agencies, including the FBI, lets users share Web content while actively controlling what recipients can do with it, said Lance Urbas, president and chief executive officer of Authentica.

Unlike traditional Web access controls and Secure Sockets Layer encryption, NetRecall uses Authentica's Active Rights Management technology to enable Web authors to control whether content can be viewed, printed, copied, saved locally or forwarded.

The authors also can revoke access to Web pages or set them to expire, said Vic DeMarines, director of product marketing.

Other features include:

The ability to secure content on the fly before it's passed to a Web browser. Seamless integration with a user's Web browser. The option to encrypt locally on the desktop rather than on a Web server. Tracking and auditing to the file level to see who has accessed, read or printed content. NetRecall is available immediately; pricing starts at $17,000 for a 100-user installation.

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