AT&T disputes FTS award

The General Services Administration is reviewing a protest filed by AT&T that asks the agency to terminate its FTS 2001 telecommunications contracts with Sprint and WorldCom Inc. and reopen competition.

AT&T is protesting GSA's decision to relax FTS 2001 specifications during the transition from FTS 2000. The transition deadline has been delayed many times.

AT&T contends that because GSA relaxed contract requirements, the nature and purpose of the FTS 2001 contracts were materially changed and the awards are invalid. GSA has received the protest, filed April 27, and is reviewing it, said Bill Bearden, a GSA spokesman.

The protest responds to information revealed in a General Accounting Office report released April 26 on the transition.

In the report, GSA said it relaxed contract requirements, including the length of transition, quality of services and collection of data for a transition information database. Relaxing those requirements did not hinder competition or service, said Sandra Bates, commissioner of GSA's Federal Technology Service, in testimony April 26 to the House Government Reform Committee's Technology and Procurement Policy Subcommittee.

GSA's evaluation of FTS 2001 proposals was based on vendors' ability to meet the requirements, AT&T said in its protest. Because GSA relaxed them, FTS 2001 has suffered higher costs to taxpayers, staffing shortages and a lack of transition data, AT&T said.

Although John Doherty, vice president of AT&T Government Markets, criticized GSA in his testimony for relaxing many contract requirements, he also said "GSA should not be forcing vendors to meet administratively burdensome FTS 2001 terms and conditions."

Featured

  • Cybersecurity
    Boy looks under voting booth at Ventura Polling Station for California primary Ventura County, California. Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

    FBI breach notice rules lauded by states, but some want more

    A recent policy change by the FBI would notify states when their local election systems are hacked, but some state officials and lawmakers want the feds to inform a broader range of stakeholders in the election ecosystem.

  • paths (cybrain/Shutterstock.com)

    Does strategic planning help organizations?

    Steve Kelman notes growing support for strategic planning efforts -- and the steps agencies take to keep those plans relevant.

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.