Letter to the editor

I find it very interesting that Bureaucratus upset the military so much with his "Pay parity" comments.

It seems to me that us peons with the civilian government must think about such things as paying for our homes (plus any repairs or maintenance they might need), medical and dental bills, eye examinations, groceries, clothing, even alcohol, etc., which, if I remember correctly, the military either gets free or at a healthy discount.

It would be nice if I could apply for food stamps. They can be very helpful when you barely can make it from paycheck to paycheck. I don't know about gasoline, but it is going so high now that I will have to carefully re-evaluate my budget and decide what to give up in order to be able to drive to work.

I would also like to be able to take advantage of the entertainment that is available at military bases, such as swimming pools and movies. If the houses on base need fixing, why can't the people living in them fix them?

I really have no quarrel with the military, and I certainly feel they should be treated fairly, but even with making the same pay as civilian personnel, they should come out far ahead.

Ann Burleson
Health Care Financing Administration

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