Security training checklist

Security experts say you can make your training program more effectiveby following these steps:

1. Get top management on board.

2. Tie the training to the mission of the agency.

3. Develop a comprehensive program. A good security program should involvea mix of computer-based training and classroom instruction, as well as ongoingawareness efforts such as posters, flyers and regular e-mail messages.

4. Teach the "whys" as well as the "hows" of security. Em.ployees aremuch more likely to follow security rules if they understand the con.sequencesof not following them.

5. Offer role-based training. Beyond the fundamentals, managers andWeb developers need more in-depth security training than clerks and humanresources personnel.

6. Account for the different types of employment environments, includingin the home, in the field and in foreign countries, as well as at contractors'locations.

7. Make the training dynamic. Training needs should be constantly monitoredand content refreshed on a regular basis.

8. Train individuals as needed. If new employees arrive after a security-awarenesscourse has been held, don't wait until next year's course to bring themup-to-date.

9. Always follow up. Employee practices must be monitored using auditsor system controls, and their awareness of security measures should be reinforcedon a regular basis.

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