Research firm turns to state and local arena

Input, an information technology market research firm that has long focused

on the commercial and federal government sectors, recently unveiled a service

for the state and local government arena.

Chantilly, Va.-based Input will provide analysis, tracking and contacts

for state, county and city governments, educational districts and regional

transportation authorities. Coverage now includes 39 states, but the company

plans to cover all 50 states within the next several weeks. Officials also

plan to build a database of local municipalities within the next several

months.

"We think there's some huge opportunities in this area," said Peter

Cunningham, president and founder of the 17-year-old company, adding that

the sector had previously been viewed as "very fragmented, very disparate."

Kevin Plexico, vice president and chief technology officer for Input,

said it makes sense to provide the service now because the state and local

government sector is growing at a faster rate than the federal sector. And

as the federal government passes on more and more responsibility to the

states, he said there will be more new market opportunities for vendors.

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